Video instructions and help with filling out and completing Where Form 5495 Notices

Instructions and Help about Where Form 5495 Notices

Selling YouTube for those of you who don't know me my name is Rosie I'm a New Zealander living in France and I like to make videos about what life in France is really like and trying to navigate the French culture and figure it all out and today I wanted to do a video on those little things that you notice when you're living in France little French culture shocks that make you think really it's not that these things they ever good or bad or the right way or the wrong way but it's just those things that naturally through living in a foreign country as an outsider looking in you notice them because they're just so different to what you're used to so without further ado let's get into some of the random things that I've noticed since living in France the first thing I want to talk about is the French and their use of checkbooks before I move to France the last time I had seen a checkbook as I used as a form of payment was when my little 87 year old grandmother would go to the bank and write her cheque to get out her $20 spending money for the week it's something that I really really associate with the older generation and just been completely obsolete form of payment but it's not really the case in France like when I moved here I realised that you need a checkbook like as a young person in their 20s you're gonna need a checkbook to pay for any university fees to pay for your bond these kinds of things I don't know why but sometimes it's chicks only and I got curious and I looked into it because I was like is it just me or is this a really normal thing in Europe and turns out that France actually has the highest rate of Czech usage in Europe I can link the study down below for those of you who are interested I personally find texts such a hassle to use I mean if you receive them you have to physically go to the bank fill out a little slip put it in the envelope deposit it and then you know several days later it gets processed so I don't really know what the love affair is with the chicks culture shock that I want to talk about is that the French like to leave their animals whole they'll serve the chicken on the table and the chicken will still have his little nick and his little head attached or they'll serve a fish and you've got the fish head there the whole fish I mean it's just they're looking at you you know what it's like like it's big round I hello and even in my canteen at work so this is a professional environment you go into the canteen to choose your meal and we had a pork option and it was Jean bon Dooley and for those of you who don't know what that is it's when you take young baby piglets this is awful but yeah and you you cook them and they have the entire I can't even say yesterday but they had the whole pig lips just there on display actually and I understand that a good way of making you realize that it's actually you know real animals that you're eating etc and also sort of related to that I've noticed that they'll eat their meat raw here a lot so there's obviously the famous steak tartare and the other day I mean because I don't necessarily always understand every single word and French especially when we're looking at a restaurant menu I ordered the duck on the menu and I wasn't expecting that but it came out as a kind of roar Pesce as well chunks of duck I guess formed into a petit meat was not cooked and so there's definitely something around appreciating food in its whole form or in its original form something else that you may notice in France depending on where you're from in the world is that things often run late here especially you know when you're meeting up with friends when you're in a work context and a meetings meant to be starting I think that things consistently run a little bit late like it's totally okay to me your friend and show up 5 to 10 minutes late or to start a meeting 5 to 10 minutes late and this is something that I didn't have a word for for a really long time but I do now it's called a time flexible culture and France is a time flexible culture and it means they view time more on an order of magnitude so at a general ballpark rather than a specific and exact quantity for the French it's the Italians who are always running late for example it's all relative but that's something that I noticed at first is speaking of the French versus the Italians actually I'm sure if there's any Italians watching this they're gonna laugh at me but I find that the French keep in touch with their family a lot and again it's all relative because the French people find that Italians to keep in touch with their family a lot I know quite a few Italians that are working here in Paris and they feel like they need to call their mum their parents every single day or you know several times the weight gets of their normal and in France I see a lot of at least weekly catch ups with family or having Sunday lunches together as a family ritual and that's a very frequent and very normal and I know now that my boyfriend on her Sunday evenings he calls his whole family and that's the bare minimum and he may also call them on the Wednesday